The new reality was that the iPhone era democratized brand perception

I remember podcasting before the iPod era. Marketers desiring to leverage this syndication medium (RSS 2.0) just uploaded audio files to websites like Odeo, Podcast Alley or, for a fee for comprising interstitial ads, audible.com. At this point, podcasting was a growing niche market where technology-savvy marketers experimented.

Then came the iPod and support for podcasting in iTunes. Suddenly, no one could remember the name of competing mp3 players or those other podcasting portals. Soon, iTunes and the iPod became synonymous with podcasting. And smart content marketers embraced the iTunes version of RSS 2.0 to publish and syndicate their media, taking advantage of enhanced podcast features and the huge subscriber base that iTunes provided. At the same time, social apps provided unprecedented access to news, product reviews, friends' opinions and influencers.

The result for marketers? The new reality was that the iPhone era democratized brand perception, converting owned media to earned media. As a result, smart brands embraced social conversations around their brands, creating authentic, transparent content that added real value to viewers.

And that was just the start. Now, many brands realize that PCs are being overtaken by cellular devices for online screening, The result --observers anticipate mobile- optimized content and a full-featured encounter.

So, what about the next iteration of devices that will shape content marketing? Perhaps smart glasses and even smart contact lenses will disrupt content marketing yet again. Augmented reality (AR), built into smart glass apps as a virtual layer of information superimposed on real life, just might be the next "killer-app" for content marketing. Bottom line--if you're a strategic content marketer, think like a technologist and prepare your content strategy for the future.


Full story: http://bit.ly/rtT9KT Contact lens experiment on a rabbit shows how "augmented reality" could be added to the eyes, by Michio Kaku.

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